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Tropical Cyclone Report

Tropical Depression Nine-E

23 - 26 August 2004

Richard J. Pasch
National Hurricane Center
12 November 2004

Nine-E appears to have originated from a tropical wave that moved off the African coast on 8 August. This system traveled westward across the tropical Atlantic basin with only isolated deep convection associated with it. The wave crossed Central America on 15 August, and for the next few days, while the system moved westward to the south of Mexico, it generated only sporadic deep convection. A persistent area of disturbed weather associated with the wave was first noted on 19 August about 725 miles south-southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. This area moved west-northwestward, and remained poorly organized, with the cloud pattern elongated from southwest to northeast. By 23 August, the convection became organized into a more circular pattern, and it is estimated that a tropical depression formed around 1800 UTC that day about 800 n mi west-southwest of Cabo San Lucas. Initially, the cyclone moved northward to north-northwestward, while strengthening only slightly to its peak intensity of 30 kt. On 24 August, the depression turned west-northwestward and it maintained this course for a couple of days. Low water temperatures and southerly to southwesterly shear prevented strengthening, and a building low- to mid-level ridge caused the cyclone to turn westward on 26 August, by which time the cyclone had lost all deep convection. The remnant low moved west-southwestward for a couple of days, and dissipated on 28 August about 950 n mi east of Hilo, Hawaii. The "best track" of this depression is listed in Table 1 and displayed in Figure 1.



Table 1: Best track for Tropical Depression Nine-E, 23-26 August 2004.
Date/Time
(UTC)
PositionPressure
(mb)
Wind Speed
(kt)
Stage
Lat.
(°N)
Lon.
(°W)
 23 / 1800 17.3 123.6 1008 25 tropical depression
 24 / 0000 17.8 123.7 1006 30 "
 24 / 0600 18.2 123.9 1005 30 "
 24 / 1200 18.4 124.2 1005 30 "
 24 / 1800 18.6 124.8 1005 30 "
 25 / 0000 18.9 125.4 1005 30 "
 25 / 0600 19.2 126.0 1007 25 "
 25 / 1200 19.4 126.8 1007 25 "
 25 / 1800 19.7 127.7 1009 25 "
 26 / 0000 19.9 128.7 1009 25 "
 26 / 0600 20.0 129.7 1009 25 "
 26 / 1200 20.0 130.8 1009 25 "
 26 / 1800 19.9 131.9 1009 25 remnant low
 27 / 0000 19.8 133.2 1009 20 "
 27 / 0600 19.7 134.1 1009 20 "
 27 / 1200 19.5 135.0 1009 20 "
 27 / 1800 19.0 136.0 1010 20 "
 28 / 0000 18.5 137.0 1010 20 "
 28 / 0600 18.0 138.5 1010 20 "
 28 / 1200     dissipated
 24 / 0600 18.2 123.9 1005 30 minimum pressure

Figure 1: Best track positions for Tropical Depression Nine-E, 23-26 August 2004.


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Page last modified: Tuesday, 15-Mar-2005 21:06:17 UTC